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Coaching Focus Group | Blog

Who would make a better coach - Barbie or Ken?

Trayton Vance
May 6, 2023
4 min read
The effectiveness of executive coaching isn't determined by gender but by various attributes like emotional intelligence, leadership style, communication skills, and the alignment between coach and coachee. While gender stereotypes persist, it's crucial to recognize that a coach's efficacy hinges on their unique skills and experiences rather than on whether they're male or female.
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In this article

1. Emotional Intelligence:

2. Leadership Styles:

3. Communication Styles:

4. Role of Experience and Expertise:

5. Match Between Coach and Coachee:

May 6, 2023
4 min read

Beyond Gender Stereotypes: An Exploration of Effective Executive Coaching

There are some interesting points that the new (2023) Barbie movie has you reflecting on, and one key focus in the movie is the gender balance which is polarised in the two worlds, Barbie World and the Real World.

The movie got me thinking about how gender may impact coaching effectiveness. But an argument that places gender as a determinant factor — men (Ken) vs women (Barbie) — oversimplifies the nuanced factors contributing to effective coaching.

Therefore, the aim of this article isn't to conclude definitively that men or women make better executive coaches but to explore various aspects and traits that can affect the success of executive coaching, independent of the coach's gender.

It's essential to recognise that coaching effectiveness hinges on the diverse set of skills, experiences, and approaches to problem-solving that coaches bring to their work. Their effectiveness is less about gender and more about how they apply these factors in their client interactions.

1. Emotional Intelligence:

Research has highlighted that emotional intelligence (EI) is crucial in effective coaching. EI involves skills like empathy, self-awareness, and social skills. While some studies suggest that women, on average, may demonstrate higher emotional intelligence, it's essential to remember that EI varies widely among individuals, regardless of gender. Therefore, men and women can be effective coaches with high emotional intelligence.

2. Leadership Styles:

Different situations call for different leadership styles. Some research indicates that women tend to adopt a more transformational leadership style, which involves mentoring and coaching their subordinates and encouraging innovative thinking. In contrast, men are often more transactional, focusing on the task at hand and rewarding or punishing based on performance. However, this isn't a rule, and both men and women can, and do, adopt a range of leadership styles.

3. Communication Styles:

Communication style also contributes significantly to coaching effectiveness. Studies have shown that women are often more adept at creating an open, inclusive environment that promotes dialogue. Men, on the other hand, may be more assertive and directive. Yet, again, these are flexible norms and vary substantially from person to person.

4. Role of Experience and Expertise:

Experience and expertise play a pivotal role in the efficacy of executive coaching. An executive coach with a thorough understanding of a client's industry, role, and the challenges they face can often provide more nuanced and applicable advice. This expertise isn't gender-dependent and maybe a stronger determinant of coaching effectiveness.

5. Match Between Coach and Coachee:

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the success of an executive coaching relationship often comes down to the match between the coach and coachee. This includes factors such as mutual respect, understanding, and trust. Some individuals might work better with a coach of a particular gender, not because of inherent skills or attributes associated with that gender, but due to personal comfort and preference.

Conclusion:

There needs to be a more straightforward answer to the question of whether men or women make better executive coaches. A coach's effectiveness largely depends on their emotional intelligence, leadership style, communication skills, experience, expertise, and the quality of the relationship with the coachee. Rather than focusing on gender, organisations should seek coaches who demonstrate these attributes and align well with the coachee's needs and preferences.

It's important to break free from gender stereotypes in all business areas, including executive coaching. While it can be beneficial to understand general trends or characteristics that may be more prevalent in one gender or the other, using these as definitive measures of effectiveness is overly simplistic and disregards the complexity and individuality of human beings.