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Coaching Focus Group | Blog

When Workplace Coaching Doesn't Meet Objectives

Trayton Vance
May 6, 2023
3 min read
When workplace coaching falls short of its goals, it's essential for both coaches and coachees to evaluate factors such as clarity of objectives, communication levels, commitment, the coach's skill set, organizational support, and external influences. Continuous reflection, open dialogue, and a dedication to growth can guide future coaching endeavors towards success.
Who is this article for?
In this article

1. Clear Objectives and Metrics

2. Open Communication Channels

3. Commitment Levels

4. Skillset of the Coach

5. Organisational Support

6. External Factors

7. Future Strategy

May 6, 2023
3 min read

When Workplace Coaching Doesn't Meet Objectives - Key Considerations for Coaches and Coachees

Coaching has been recognised as a vital tool for professional growth and organisational success. When done correctly, it can lead to better leadership, increased employee engagement, and improved performance. However, there will be times when a workplace coaching programme doesn’t meet its intended objectives. Understanding why can be crucial for both the coach and the coachee. Here are some key considerations for both parties:

1. Clear Objectives and Metrics

For Coaches: Were the coaching objectives clearly defined from the outset? Ambiguous or moving targets can make it difficult to achieve tangible results. Ensure that there's clarity about what success looks like and how it will be measured.

For Coachees: Ensure you understand and agree upon the objectives. If you're unclear or unsure about what's expected, voice your concerns early.

2. Open Communication Channels

For Coaches: Regular feedback is crucial. Encourage coachees to share their thoughts, concerns, and insights. This can help in real-time course corrections.

For Coachees: Do not hesitate to voice your concerns or ask questions. Your coach is there to guide and support you, but they can't help if they're unaware of issues.

3. Commitment Levels

For Coaches: Reflect on whether the coachee seemed fully engaged and committed to the process. Without full commitment, it's challenging to achieve the desired outcomes.

For Coachees: Self-reflect on your level of engagement. Were you truly committed to the coaching process, or were there distractions and barriers?

4. Skillset of the Coach

For Coaches: It's important to engage in continuous professional development. Assess if you had the right tools and techniques for this particular coachee or situation.

For Coachees: Was your coach a good match for your needs? Not every coach will be the perfect fit for every coachee, and it's okay to acknowledge that.

5. Organisational Support

For Coaches: Consider whether the organisation provided enough support. Was there time allocated for coaching sessions, and were there resources available for the coachee to utilize?

For Coachees: Reflect on whether you received the necessary support from your organization. Did your superiors understand and prioritise the coaching process?

6. External Factors

For Coaches and Coachees: Sometimes, external circumstances can derail a coaching program. Economic downturns, global crises, or organizational shifts can play a role. Recognize these and discuss how they might have impacted the outcomes.

7. Future Strategy

For Coaches: Based on your reflections, determine what could be done differently in future coaching engagements.

For Coachees: Consider what you can change or adapt in future coaching sessions. Would setting different goals or seeking a different type of coaching be beneficial?

In conclusion, when a workplace coaching programme doesn't meet its objectives, it's an opportunity for both the coach and coachee to reflect, learn, and adapt. Open communication, self-reflection, and a commitment to continuous improvement are crucial in ensuring that future coaching engagements are more successful.